The expression “the kitchen is the heart of a home” has been put to good use in a joint project that uses flowers and herbs to highlight human experiences and stories of grief, happiness, heartbreak and love.

Called Ħwawar u Fjuri, the project aims to highlight human experiences and stories revolving around the use of herbs and flowers in kitchens.

It is being organised by Integra Foundation and the Carmelite Priory in Mdina to mark the theme of Sustainable Food Systems for Food Security and Nutrition chosen for this year’s World Food Day, marked yesterday.

The project aims to create a space where Maltese and migrants can meet each other and learn about different cultures through the narration of stories on the use of herbs and flowers in one’s own country and culture of origin.

Five workshops will be organised as part of the project, which is funded by the President’s Creativity Award, over the span of a year. These workshops, titled L-Ikla (food), Namur (passion), Talba (prayer), Demgħa (tear) and Qawmien (resurrection) will provide a platform for people to tell their stories.

Through this project, herbs and flowers will become a point of contact between Maltese and migrants living in Malta who will get to know the other through storytelling and sharing a common love for flowers.

We want to use stories to highlight that which is common and that we share as humans

Integra Foundation and the Carmelite Priory Mdina designed the project to promote integration precisely through the narration of stories about the use of herbs and flowers.

“Sometimes images of people from Africa landing in Malta by boat may ignite fear and reinforce ideas of difference and strangeness.

“We want to use stories about flowers and herbs as a point of contact, to highlight that which is common and that we share as humans,” they said.

Those who want to take part in the workshops can send an e-mail to hwawar.fjuri@gmail.com. Those interested may share stories that will be published on the blog at www.hwawarfjuri.wordpress.com.

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