A Fabergé notebook in which Queen Victoria recorded her Diamond Jubilee celebrations is to go on public display.

The Fabergé notebook is said to have been bought in St Petersburg in December 1896 and given to Queen Victoria as a Christmas present by Tsar Nicholas II and his wife Alexandra Feodorovna

The book, signed and dated by the monarch, has signatures of guests who attended dinner the evening before the official jubilee commemoration of June 22, 1897.

Crowned heads of Europe are included among the guests and Queen Victoria, Britain’s longest-serving monarch, later described the evening in her journal.

She wrote: “The dinner was in the Supper Room. All the family, foreign Royalties, special ambassadors and envoys were invited. I sat between the Arch Duke Franz Ferdinand and the Pce of Naples.”

The notebook, made by Russian jeweller Carl Fabergé, will go on display in the Treasures From The Queen’s Palaces exhibition at the Queens Gallery in the Palace of Holyroodhouse, Edinburgh, from March 16.

It is one of around 20 pieces of Fabergé works in the exhibition which marks the Queen’s own Diamond Jubilee this year.

Queen Victoria and Queen Elizabeth II are the only two sovereigns in the history of the British monarchy to have reached the 60-year milestone.

The exhibition is said to reflect the tastes of monarchs and other family members who have shaped the royal collection over the past 500 years.

It will feature a total of 100 paintings, drawings, miniatures, manuscripts, pieces of furniture, ceramics and items of jewellery from nine royal residencies.

Many of the items will be shown in Scotland for the first time.

The Fabergé notebook is said to have been bought in St Petersburg in December 1896 and given to Queen Victoria as a Christmas present by Tsar Nicholas II and his wife Alexandra Feodorovna.

The Russian pair had visited Balmoral Castle earlier that year.

An inscription in the book says: “For Dearest Grandmama from Nicky and Alix. Xmas 1896.”

Two of Fabergé’s imperial Easter eggs are part of the exhibition, one of which is a mosaic egg featuring portraits of the tsar’s five children.

The egg was the Tsar’s Easter gift to his wife in 1914 and was bought by King George V in 1933.

Treasures From The Queen’s Palaces runs until November 4.

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