Businessman Maurice Mizzi has been appointed the first Guardian of Future Generations, part of a new high-level commission intended to promote sustainable development in government and industry.

The new body, announced by Environment Minister Jose Herrera, will be tasked with promoting sustainable development in the public and private sector, developing networks of scientific understanding, and providing goals and direction to government bodies.

The commission will consist of Mr Mizzi, president of the Mizzi Organisation, as well as Joseph Zammit Tabone, Alan Pulis and Jason Bonnici.

Mr Mizzi’s remuneration for the role will be donated to the Spiro Mizzi Foundation, a charity he administers working with children in poverty in Malta.

“Ensuring sustainable development is now no longer a moral requirement but a legal one,” Mr Herrera said, noting that Malta was one of the only countries in the world to have a specific law in this regard.

“Sustainable principles should be integrated into the daily workings of the private and public sector. Future generations have a right to enjoy the same quality of life that we do today.”

The concept of a Guardian of Future Generations was first floated at the UN general assembly in 1992 by then foreign minister Guido de Marco.

The concept of a Guardian of Future Generations was first floated at the UN general assembly in 1992 by then foreign minister Guido de Marco.

Mr Herrera said the new body would have a wide remit and high level of autonomy, becoming one of the most high-powered commissions in Malta. He also pledged the support of his department and other ministries.

Mr Mizzi, the new Guardian, highlighted problems of over-development and congestion, which he said had “ruined Malta in many ways”. He said that while ameliorating the life of future generations was a difficult task, the commission would begin putting forward its suggestions soon.

Comments

Comments not loading?

We recommend using Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox.

Comments powered by Disqus