This Christmas, GoTo Malta is giving a helping hand to Nature Trust – FEE Malta in a major habitat restoration project currently under way in one of the island’s key natural areas.

The group of around 15 volunteers from GoTo Malta joined forces with Nature Trust – FEE Malta site managers to help clear one of the water courses found on the Pembroke Natura 2000 site. Together, the project team worked to clear the water course from harmful invasive alien species, before planting the native and rare Juncus acutus and Carex extensa plants – both species known for their ability to filter water. 

“Maintaining these water courses is vital, not just to enable rainwater to drain from roads and residential areas, but also to act as a crucial water source for our natural areas and replenish the water table,” said James Gabarretta, site manager at Nature Trust – FEE Malta. 

“Due to our limited resources and green areas, every single restoration project related to Malta’s environment is important. With the generous contribution of time and energy to these projects from teams like GoTo Malta’s, we can work together to preserve what’s remaining and appreciate what we have.”

As one of the oldest and largest environmental NGOs in Malta, Nature Trust – FEE Malta’s values of protecting and preserving the natural heritage of the Maltese Islands mirror GoTo’s vision for a sustainable, environmentally-aware future.

“It was a pleasure for us to partner with Nature Trust in this hugely important initiative,” said Zach Bergerson, GoTo Global’s country manager for Malta. 

“One of GoTo’s key missions is to help reduce private vehicles on our roads, so that cities can one day have more green space than parking lots. We will keep our commitment to CSR activities with local organisations for the benefit of Malta’s community and environment throughout 2022. Meanwhile, the GoTo Malta team wishes to thank all our riders for choosing GoTo in 2021 and for joining our exciting journey of continued growth towards a more sustainable world.” 

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