Infrastructure Minister Aaron Farrugia said he is willing to discuss plans to reduce the environmental damage caused by the planned Mrieħel flyover project.

The Qormi local council has strongly objected to the original proposal as it would see the take-up of agricultural land adjacent to the bypass.

Speaking to Times of Malta, Farrugia insisted no final decision had yet been taken about the exact mechanics of the project.

Farrugia, a former environment minister, said he is willing to discuss ways to limit the environmental damage that would be caused by the plans.

The government’s flyover proposal will eat up a minimum of 14 tumoli of fields- Qormi local council

Questioned if the government would instead opt for a tunnel, as proposed by the Qormi council, Farrugia was non-committal.

The council claims the underpass would not take up a centimetre of agricultural land.

Farrugia said the final decisions would only be taken once all the necessary studies are in hand.

The flyover is earmarked for construction near the pedestrian footbridge.

The government has insisted on the flyover to remove the need for traffic coming from the south to have to cross the busy bypass to enter one area of the so-called business district.

According to the council, the government’s flyover proposal will eat up “a minimum of 14 tumoli of fields”.

Farrugia said the final decisions would only be taken once all the necessary studies are in hand.

Speaking during an interview on the state broadcaster on Monday, Farrugia said a handful of large and “controversial” road projects are set for this legislature.

“We have four or five controversial projects that will be unveiled soon,” Farrugia said.

This is understood to be a reference to major flyover projects in Msida, Mrieħel and Qormi.

Another road-widening project is also set to be carried out in Pembroke near the Wembley Service Station. 

The Msida project will be the first project to take off, the sources said.

First announced in 2019, the major intervention proposes the elimination of the Msida circus junction, to be replaced with flyovers, allowing traffic to flow uninterrupted but also adding massive concrete infrastructure in the heart of the seaside town.

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